MEMS-CRLH Devices

       

 

 Circuit reconfigurability and multi-band /broad- band behaviours are increasing requirements of modern RF/microwave telecommunications systems.

In this context, our research group is involved in the analysis and design of reconfigurable and miniaturized devices (microwave circuits and/or antennas) combining the CRLH (Composite Righ/Left-Handed) approach with the RF MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System) technology.

Due to their unusual dispersion properties, CRLH Transmission Lines (TLs) have attracted widespread interest in recent years. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that the use of CRLH TLs adds degrees of freedom in designing common microwave devices, which can be exploited to achieve size reduction or improved performance, such as dual-band and/or broadband behaviours.

On the other hand, MEMS are one of the most promising technologies in designing reconfigurable devices. In fact, with respect to different commonly adopted solutions (PIN diodes, or FET switches), the use of MEMS switches results in a lower loss, wider band performance, and a lower DC power consumption.
Consequently, we are exploiting the advantages deriving from the use of the CRLH approach combined with MEMS technology.

Specifically, our research activity on this topic is focused on the use of MEMS switches in designing CRLH TLs with a reconfigurable behaviour. For instance, in [1,2] a MEMS based CRLH TL well-suited for phase shifter applications is proposed. Results demonstrate that, with respect to conventional printed transmission lines, the use of the CRLH TL approach leads to a consistent broadening effect (Fig. 1).

 

CRLH-MEMS1_ENG

1.    Giuseppina Monti, Rosa De Paolis, Luciano Tarricone, “2-Bit Phase Shifter Based on a MEMS-CRLH Transmission Line”, proceeding of Meta 2008 Conference, 7-10 October, Marrakesh (Marocco), 2008.

2.    R. De Paolis, G. Monti, L. Tarricone, “Sfasatore a 3 Stati in Tecnologia MEMS-CRLH”, proceeding of XVII Riunione Nazionale di Elettromagnetismo, Lecce (Italy), September 15-19, 2008.